Stress and Therapy

23:30 § Leave a comment

Studies have shown that between 70 and 80 percent of all disease and illness is stress related. Stress research has shown that regulating environmental factors decreases the risk of stress related illnesses. Model to show different types of comfort.


Music Therapy

There has recently been a considerable interest in the therapeutic potential of music.  A neurological study involving subjects connected to an electroencephalograph (EEG device) while listening to slowtempo music  revealed that the musical rhythm quickly synchronized brain rhythms to its beat an effect also seen with strobe lights.

Colour Therapy

Exposure to coloured light is another technique for promoting relaxation. Colour therapy has been traced back to ancient Egypt, where patients at a healing temple were treated in rooms designed to break up the sun’s rays into colours of the spectrum. I



Colour Research

23:30 § Leave a comment

Walltherapy began in April 2003 and was a collaboration between Rachel Wingfield and flour aiming to bring together areas of design with neuroscience and colour science. This is essentially a research project aimed at developing a new design methodology for bespoke, end-user created designs that can have a positive effect on their environment.

Walltherapy enables everyone to create their own highly individual personal environment from their psychophysically determined colour preferences to suit and possibly enhance people’s sense of well-being. It is well established in scientific literature that ambient colour, light and texture can affect mood and behaviour this is why a conventional decorative surface, such as wallpaper has been chosen as the interface for this experiment.

Residency at Queen Elizabeth Hospital

23:30 § Leave a comment

This project is called ‘Seeds of Recovery’, developed by loop.pH working with the hospitals Elixir Arts Programme over a nine month period. Loop.pH developed design solutions to improve the hospital environment that also assists in regulating the heat and light levels of the space.

Digital Dawn – loop.pH

23:30 § Leave a comment


DigitalDawn is a reactive window blind with a surface that is in constant flux, growing in luminosity in response to its surroundings. It digitally emulates the process of photosynthesis using printed electroluminescent technology.

Light sensors monitor the changing light levels of the space triggering the growth of the foliage on the blind. The piece explores how changing light levels within a space can have a profound and physiological impact on our sense of well being.

Where Am I?

You are currently browsing entries tagged with well-being at Ambient Environments.